Paul Miracovici – Landscape with geese

- Gouache on cardboard
– 25/35
– signed

€1.500

Paul Miracovici was born in the commune of Frumoasa in Harghita on February 21, 1906.

He was a Romanian painter, art critic, graphic artist and muralist, professor of monumental art and theorist at the “Nicolae Grigorescu” Institute of Fine Arts in Bucharest. He had a fairly active presence in the artistic chronicle of the interwar period – Paul Miracovici made his debut at the Official Salon in 1926.

Miracovici painted landscapes, still lifes, portraits, made with a keen sense of decorum as can be seen in the mural painting at the International Hotel in Mamaia as well as in the works “Children from the Land of the Dead”, “Holiday at the Mouth of Humor” . Paul Miracovici was one of the creators of the modern Romanian tourist poster from the 1930s.

He studied in Paris just like other great Romanian painters such as Arthur Verona, Jean Alexandru Steriadi, Camil Ressu and Nicolae Tonitza at the Grande Chaumière Academy between 1930 and 1933.

In 1932, Paul Miracovici won a two-year scholarship to the Romanian School in Fontenay-aux-Roses.

Paul Miracovici made his debut at the Official Salon in Paris in 1926 with a “Self-Portrait” and was one of the most praised and productive interwar painters.

After participating in several exhibitions in Paris, at the Tuileries Salon and at the “Salon des Independents”, Miracovici returns to Romania and becomes an art critic after which he obtains various orders from the state decorating Romanian pavilions abroad.

He worked as a muralist, a profession he embraced until his death in 1973. The activity of muralist as well as professor at the Institute of Fine Arts in Bucharest were financially profitable but were an impediment. in its evolution in terms of painting.

Thus, on the occasion of an exhibition made at the Dalles Hall in 1970, the youthful influences of Albert Marquet and Pierre Bonnard combined with a tendency towards abstract, somewhat confused the art-consuming public.

The mural works made by Paul Miracovici until 1948 remained a landmark in murals. His post-war painting is valuable and shows a dose of Renaissance perception that becomes more evident over time.